Literary Criticism:

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Re: Literary Criticism:

Alvin B.Seniel BSEd IV-A
'Toy's has feelings and emotions' that is how John Alan Lasseter explain the story. Since John Alan was a child he was good on arts (animated arts), he has one favorite toy whose name is Woody whom he played everyday. When John Alan's birthday came his mother give him a toy whose name is Buzz where it becomes his priority than Woody, where its exactly as the "toy story". Time passes and Jhon Alan wants to apply at Disney to show up his talent, he noticed that their animation was not good enough he try to suggest his idea which is the third dimension but he end up rejected.
For the second time he applied at Lucas Film Computer Graphic Group and there, he meet Alvy Ray Smith and Ed Catmull and they become friends. On that company, he do what he want and all are in his favor. As time pass by the three of them become the owner of Pixar Studio as the new name of Lucas Film Computer Graphic Group. The time came that Disney wanted John Alan to come back at the company. At the end he become Chief Executive Officer.

-Katrina U. Sulayao
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Re: Literary Criticism:

Buenafe B. Magtulis Jr.
In reply to this post by Mario
        TOY STORY 1
         
            John Alan Lasseter born January 12, 1957 is an American animator, film director, screenwriter, and film producer. He currently is the chief creative officer of Pixar Animation Studios, Walt Disney Animation Studios, and DisneyToon Studios. He is also the Principal Creative Advisor for Walt Disney Imagineering.Lasseter began his career as an animator with The Walt Disney Company. After being fired from Disney for promoting computer animation, he joined Lucasfilm, where he worked on the then-groundbreaking use of CGI animation. The Graphics Group of the Computer Division of Lucasfilm was sold to Steve Jobs and became Pixar in 1986. Lasseter oversees all of Pixar's films and associated projects as executive producer. In addition, he directed Toy Story (1995), A Bug's Life (1998), Toy Story 2 (1999), Cars (2006), and Cars 2 (2011). Since 2007, Lasseter also oversees all of Walt Disney Animation Studios' (and its division DisneyToon Studios') films and associated projects as executive producer.Now back to the TOY STORY movie he made., I like this movie so much because it makes me recalling of what are the toys I have when I was a child.And I am sure that Lasseter is a fond of collecting all kind of toys that he used in this movie.That is why I can say that john Lasseter's childhood is connected to this movie he made.
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Re: Literary Criticism:

Realyn T. de Villa
In reply to this post by Mario
      I am not fan of watching cartoon movies. At first, I am not also interested in Toy Story. How ever, my daughter ask me if is true that toys have life also as human and if they also talking with each other if she was not around. I asked my daughter if the movie was good and she answered "it was nice but they were quarreling also like me and my sister". I watched the movie and it so true that characters were competing with each other. Maybe my daughter said that because she did not fully understand the moral value that a viewer can get from the story. In addition , the movie was not portrays in her native language so she can't fully understand it. For me the movie was good because it give lesson that children should value and love their toys. It was really suited to children.
      When I read the author's biography, it affects my judgement about the story that it was really suited for children.They may be made for children, but they are most certainly not about children, or their parents for that matter. I think the story was highly influence by  Lasseter enthusiasm for nascent computer animation technology that put him at odds with some of his superiors, however, and he was fired in 1983. The Toy Story is a veiled commentary on life in the capitalistic and corporate world of a employee of Computer animation company.The “toys” in the Toy Story films confront issues more applicable to the life of an adult worker than a child.The relationships the toys in the films share with their owners and with one another resemble nothing so much as relationships within the corporate world. Andy is neither a doting parent nor a loving friend; he is a mildly affectionate boss. He and the other children in the films are distant from the toys and the viewers. This relationship is demonstrated throughout the film series that relates in corporate worlds that Lasseter lives.
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